DUP go on the offensive over RHI

The DUP have released the first email from the Whistle Blower over the RHI scheme;

The Deputy Leader of the DUP, Nigel Dodds says this email vindicates the First Minister;

There has been a quite scurrilous attempt to blame Arlene Foster for the RHI saga. The endlessly repeated claim has been that she failed to follow up on the whistle blower concerns.

“Now we know that no such concerns were raised with her. This is no criticism of the lady in question. She has behaved with great integrity throughout and even told the media that her initial email to the Minister did not go into detail.

“The Department has admitted it should have responded differently when the RHI were subsequently aired.

“The Department’s permanent secretary has made clear throughout that Arlene Foster acted entirely appropriately.

“Sadly Opposition parties and some section of the media didn’t want to know that. They have been engaged in a disgraceful and baseless blame game for which they should now apologise.”

The DUP deputy leader added: “No one is denying for a second that RHI is a totally unacceptable state of affairs. But the attempts to blame Arlene Foster have descended to hysterical levels.”

 

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  • file

    You are allowed to proof-read before you post; it is not, however, compulsory, Droog. Muphry’s Law.

  • Skibo

    Jollyraj the Irish language is in the position it is in now because of the way our neighbours treated anyone who spoke it.
    You cannot argue the fact that is is the native language of Ireland with a number of dialects. The fact of not supporting it would be crass stupidity. It would go along the lines of the Government should not support the Arts as the money would be better spent in the NHS or why are we supplying street lighting when everyone should be responsible for seeing where they are going.
    If we continue along your argument then why not move from English to Chinese or Spanish as both are more widely spoken that English.
    Ignorance is bliss.

  • Jollyraj

    “If we continue along your argument then why not move from English to Chinese or Spanish as both are more widely spoken that English.
    Ignorance is bliss.”

    Ignorance is indeed bliss. That doesn’t follow from my argument at all – since my argument is that we should broaden our linguistic horizons by learning more useable languages, not fewer.

    As to more widely spoken – nope, English is the most widely spoken. Mandarin has more mother tongue speakers – but English is by somr distance the most learned second language. And thus far more people speak it.

    The Irish are very fortunate to grow up speaking a language that much of the rest of the world feels the need to make the effort to learn. My argument is that they, and we, should capitalize on that advantage by learning a second or even third language that hundreds of millions of others speak. You’d prefer to force children to spend those same time, effort, and resources learning a language that (in relative terms) no one does.

    This is part of the reason why Irish Republicanism doesn’t have, never did have, and never can have any future in it. Too much focus on bitter ideology, and no real focus on practical things.

  • Skibo

    The most widely spoken language in the world is Mandarin. The fact that a similar amount of people can speak English does not follow through that they can all speak fluently in English.
    A report published by the British Council estimates that around 2 billion people will be learning English at any one time during the next decade. But even then, more than two thirds of the world will not speak English.
    I am not underestimating the power of the English language, sure don’t I use it myself. What I do request is that our native language is not cast aside and allowed to rot in the bin of so many cast-offs from the British Empire. For that reason alone, the Irish language is worth investing in.
    The Irish who grew up speaking Irish were not so fortunate and their treatment by the British is the very reason that the Irish language is in the position it is no.
    people should stop pillorying the Irish language as a waste of money and embrace it as something we could all have in common.
    Sure weren’t we so privileged by the British to be snatched from that savage language and taught the civilised language of English that was used to plunder a third of the world and set nations to slavery. Then they rewarded the slave traders with fortunes and asked them not to do it again and looked so christian like banning slavery. rant over so much for your wonders of the English language.
    I do not demand that children are forced to learn the Irish language, I merely want it promoted. We could treat it like say pellet burners and spend some serious money on it!

  • Skibo

    One other thing I forgot to mention
    “This is part of the reason why Irish Republicanism doesn’t have, never did have, and never can have any future in it. Too much focus on bitter ideology, and no real focus on practical things.”
    Had the Unionist one party state NI embraced the use of the Irish language, Republicans would have had no reason to demand it’s protection.
    Stop faffing about it and learn a cupla focal, you could enjoy it.
    Coming from a farming background, I point you to the Irish Moiled breed. It was virtually extinct, in a worse condition than the Great Panda. A few farmers ( two main ones in Northern Ireland) banded together and through the society and eventually help from the government they have managed to save it.
    The Irish language is worth saving.
    One other thing, I do not demand anyone uses the Irish language but at the same time I do not stop anyone, whoever they are use it.
    It is not politicised by use, it is politicised by the powers who demand it is not used.

  • Jollyraj

    “Stop faffing about it and learn a cupla focal, you could enjoy it.”

    No doubt I would. Everyone has particular talents – I’m a person who loves languages and I pick them up relatively easily. I speak several well enough to use them for work. I wouldn’t invest the time to learn Irish, for sure, but no doubt I’d enjoy having a few words of it.

    “Coming from a farming background”

    FInally, a common language!

    “I point you to the Irish Moiled breed. It was virtually extinct, in a worse condition than the Great Panda. A few farmers ( two main ones in Northern Ireland) banded together and through the society and eventually help from the government they have managed to save it.”

    I take your point. The Irish Moiled is a beautiful breed and, though I’ve never seen more than a pair, a field full off them must be a wonderful sight – much like a field filled with roan shorthorns in the early morning is an inspiring sight. Or it was to an old farmboy like me, stepping out to check on the livestock before school on the land my father’s father’s father farmed 🙂

    Worth preserving? Absolutely! Like the English Longhorn, they are part of our heritage – and it’s sad that modern continental breeds have largely usurped our native breeds in Britain, and apparently in Ireland, too. And I’d take a dairy shorthorn over a holstein any time – though most would disagree.

    “The Irish language is worth saving.”

    For sure. Though I’ll never agree that children should learn it ahead of other languages that will be a lot more useful to them out in the wide world where, to most people, neither Northern Ireland nor Ireland itself matter much to anyone.

  • Jollyraj

    “The most widely spoken language in the world is Mandarin. The fact that a similar amount of people can speak English does not follow through that they can all speak fluently”

    I think we’re quibbling terms here, and the fairest I can say is that we are both correct in the slightly different points we’re making. I would consider language speakers to be those with a reasonable conversational grasp of it. Say B1- B2 or above, not just fluency level. Why, on this very site there are a few marginal English speakers – if we’re including written English. Special mention to GOM on that score 😉

  • Skibo

    I think it would be nice for everyone to have a few words of it. for one thing it could not then be known as a Republican badge of honour.
    It would not be of any consequence to people outside Ireland but I remember a short video of a young Chinese lad who wanted to visit Ireland and spent his time learning Irish. The young barmen in Dublin thought he was speaking Chinese but Paddy sitting at the bar could understand him and spoke away to him.
    One barman said to the other I didn’t know Paddy spoke Chinese!
    By the way I agree with you on the Shorthorn. Holstein is merely a big bag of bones and skin that supplies copious amounts of low grade milk.

  • Skibo

    One of the biggest faults I find with the English language is the number of words spelt differently yet are pronounced the same. I believe most non-English speaking people find it one of the most difficult languages to learn but personally I think Chinese would have that award.