Gerry Adams at Easter. In full

I though it worthwhile to put on the record Gerry Adams’ Easter Centenary address, part unreconstructed old republicanism, part election address, a classic of its kind in style and content, without further comment.

 
On Sunday 27th March, Sinn Féin President Gerry Adams TD addressed the Easter Rising commemoration in Belfast’s Milltown Cemetery. Mr Adams stated that hurts and divisions must be healed if we are to realise the vision of the 1916 Proclamation.
HIs speech in full:

Address by Úachtarán Shinn Féin, Gerry Adams TD:
A chairde agus a chomráidithe,
I want to welcome you all here today to this holy place on this historic date. I want to especially welcome the families and friends of our patriot dead.
Tá muid fior buioch daoibhse go leir. Your loved ones died not for the past but for the future. Like the men and women of 1916 they went out to undo the centuries of colonisation and injustice by building a new future; a better future.
It was one hundred years ago, on Easter Monday 1916, in the centre of Dublin, when a small band of revolutionaries proclaimed an independent Irish republic.
 
This group of poorly equipped Irish men and women took on the might of the largest empire the world had ever seen. It was an empire built on conquest, exploitation, brute force, and repression. 

Following six days of heroic resistance the centre of Dublin lay in ruins.
The leaders of the Provisional Government met for the last time in 16 Moore Street and ordered a surrender.
 
They were court martialled by the British. 14 were executed in the stone-breakers yards in Kilmainham. Tomas Ceannt was executed in Cork. And Roger Casement was hanged in London.

Bhí an Sasanaigh ag iarraidh splanc na saoirse in Éirinn a mhúchadh le méid agus luas na mbásanna.
Ach ní raibh an ceart acu.
 
Thug an Éirí Amach agus an cogadh a thainig ina dhiaidh sampla a leanadh le ar fud an domhain sna tíortha eile a raibh an Bhreatain i gcumhacht ann.
 
Ag croílár Éirí Amach Naoi Déag is a Sé Déag náPoblacht neamhspleách na hÉireanna bhunú.

 

But the Civil War and counter-revolution ushered in the partition of Ireland and the creation of two conservative states in place of the 32 County Republic which was the aim of the Rising.

The North became a one-party, Orange State where Irish nationalists were excluded from power and denied opportunity.
As we all know, that power and privilege was imposed and protected by British guns.

Republican resistance was offered at various stages over the decades.
In the late 1960s, the violent state response to the democratic demands of the civil rights campaign developed into full scale armed conflict.

Today we also pay tribute to all of those who, in every decade since 1916, stood by Ireland and stood by the Republic.

Our country and our people suffered hugely as a result of conflict in the 1970s, ‘80s and ‘90s.

Huge progress has been made in recent years. The Peace Process and the Good Friday Agreement marked a historic shift in politics on this island.

For the first time, the roots of conflict were addressed and a democratic route to Irish unity opened up.

But there is much yet to be done. Hurts must be healed. Divisions ended.
The scourge of sectarianism must be tackled and ended.

The effects of Partition on the South must also be addressed. By executing the signatories and other leaders the British removed the revolutionary leadership and the most advanced and progressive thinkers and activists.
They paved the way for the counter revolution that was to follow the revolutionary period and the establishment of two mean spirited -narrow minded states. In the Civil War, the forces of conservatism – the Church hierarchy, the media and big business – all supported the Free State regime and opposed those who held out for the Republic proclaimed in Easter Week 1916.

The people of the north were abandoned.
The Free State was harsh on the poor, on women and on republicans or radicals of any kind. Our native language was devalued and subverted. Most, if not all of our renowned writers were banned. Censorship was rife. A false morality was imposed on our people. The scandals we witnessed recently emerged from this post-colonial condition.
Seo an rud a fágadh linn ar deireadh in áit na Poblachta.

Is chun leasa na ndaoine in Éirinn sa lá atá inniu ann an fíor-Phoblacht sin a chruthú.

 While there have been improvements since it was first established the southern state is not the Republic proclaimed in 1916.
Current efforts by the Dublin establishment to pretend that it is are an insult to the men and women of 1916. There are those who say that honouring the 1916 leaders might retrospectively justify violence. They refuse to attend commemorations. But they say nothing critical of John Redmond and Edward Carson’s role in sending tens of thousands of young men, from the Shankill and the Falls and villages throughout the north and the rest of the island to fight Germans, Austrians and Turks – with whom they and Ireland had no quarrel.
38 million people were killed in that imperial adventure. Were John Redmond and Edward Carson not ‘men of violence’? Carson certainly was an imperialist – a big house unionist with little concern for the social or economic needs of working class unionists or the rest of us.
For our part the 1916 Proclamation remains the mission statement for Irish republicans today. It is a freedom charter for all the people of this island which guarantees religious and civil liberty and promotes equal rights and opportunities for all citizens. 
The Proclamation is also a declaration of social and economic intent for a rights-based society in which the people are sovereign.

Agus Bliain an Chéid linn, déanann fórmhór na ndaoine in Éirinn agus thar lear, comóradh go bródúil ar Éirí Amch Naoi Déag a Sé Déag agus ar Fhorógra na Poblachta.

These are the principles on which Sinn Féin stands today.
When the centenary has come and gone there should be more left behind that a memory of a good day out. The year ahead is a time for renewal and planning, a year for promoting the republican ideals of democracy and equality.
Last month Sinn Féin took further strides forward. As a result of the general election there are now 23 Sinn Fein TDs in Leinster House. We expect to double our representation in the Seanad next month. We hope they will include Niall Ó Donnghaile, a good East Belfast republican. And in May there will be Assembly elections.
With each election the Sinn Féin vote grows and the number of elected representatives increases. But it’s what we do with this political strength that is really important. Sinn Féin is now the main opposition party in the Dáil.
In the Assembly Sinn Fein has been the driving force behind the progressive measures that have blocked water charges, protected free prescriptions and defended welfare payments and promoted the Irish language.

Despite the Irish and British government’s negativity Sinn Féin has delivered the Fresh Start deal which protects core public services, particularly in health and education and the most vulnerable in our society. The Assembly elections will be on May 5th – the anniversary of Bobby Sands death after 66 days on hunger strike.

We remember Bobby and his comrades and the blanket men and the women in Armagh. After the Assembly election we want to emerge with a stronger mandate. A mandate that will allow us to continue with our work. A mandate to tackle sectarianism, racism, and homophobia. A mandate to deliver marriage equality. A mandate to deliver a future of equals, in a society of equals for all our citizens. That means fighting for every seat and every vote.
In June Sinn Féin will oppose Brexit. While we are correctly critical of the EU nonetheless the imposition of land borders and economic barriers is not in the interest of the people of this island.
Our centenary celebrations would be incomplete without due recognition being paid to the American connection.

The Rising was funded by Irish Americans –the children of An Gorta Mór/The Great Hunger.

I want to welcome our Irish American friends and our friends from Canada who are with us today.
A united Ireland means the unity of the people of this island, including those who see themselves as British.

That is why Irish governments must pursue every avenue to promote all-Ireland co-operation and to build relationships between all our people.

This must include genuine efforts to outreach to the unionists on the basis of equality.

There was never a better time to plan and deliver on an all-Ireland basis.
Thinking unionists know this makes sense for the economy, agriculture, healthcare, energy, the environment and many other sectors.

Elements of the Good Friday and subsequent Agreements remain to be implemented.

There is an urgent need for the Irish Government to face up to the British Government’s refusal to fulfil its obligations. 
There is also an ongoing need to enlist the support for this necessary endeavour of our friends internationally, including and especially in the USA.
I want to commend the families of the 1916 leaders who took the Irish government to court to prevent the demolition of Moore St, the last meeting place of the 1916 leaders. It is a metaphor for our times that the families were forced to do this because the state was about protecting a developer who planned to replace the laneways of history into a shopping mall. But the government lost.So did the developer. Well done to the 1916 relatives. It is clear that had Pearse and Connolly and their comrades gone on to form a working government Ireland today would be a better place, and a fairer and more equal society.
So that is the challenge facing us. We must give our children the best possible chance to fulfil their potential and to live happy, full and contented lives. An Ireland which is the best place to grow up in, to grow old in and to enjoy life in. We love Ireland. We value this small island.

But it is the people who are at the centre of our core values of equality, liberty and fraternity. So our resolve must be to end all divisions and to unite our people, especially in this city of Belfast. I also want to thank the republican people of this great city for remaining true to the cause of Irish independence. Without your support, your loyalty, your resilience and generosity we would not be where we are today.

In conclusion, I want to single out the contribution of women in our struggle. Both Connolly and Pearse praised the women of 1916. Before the Volunteers left the GPO Padraig Pearse told the women that the fight would not have lasted so long without them and when the history of that week would be written the highest honour and credit should go to the women. So we salute all our sisters in struggle. There can be no Saoirse na h’Éireann gan Saoirse na mBan.

As we stand by the graves of our friends and comrades let us be clear. The reactionaries and revisionists, the naysayers and begrudgers, the modern day Redmonites pontificate and waffle about how wrong 1916 was. Sinn Féin is crystal clear on this. 1916 was right. The men and women of that rising were right. It was Republic against Empire. Republicanism versus Imperialism. We know what side we are on. in We stand by and for the Republic.

Pearse put it well. He told his court martial; “You cannot conquer Ireland. You cannot extinguish the Irish passion for freedom.” Connolly also faced his court martial unbowed and unbroken. He told them: “We went out to break the connection between this country and the British Empire and to establish an Irish Republic.”
That is our resolve also. So, join the Rising.
Bígí linn. Ar aghaidh linn le chéile.

Up the Republic – An Phoblacht abú.

 

 

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  • Jag

    “Sinn Féin is now the main opposition party in the Dáil.”

    What?

  • Jag

    Certain SF TDs eg Meldy Munster in Louth, claimed in Easter orations that SF was the largest party in the country.

    “today we stand stronger than ever, 35 years after Haughey and Thatcher thought they had defeated the hunger strikers we are now the largest party in Ireland.”
    http://droghedalife.com/791/184028/a/drogheda-republicans-pay-tribute-to-the-men-and-women-of-1916

    Let’s do the maths – 14% of 4.7m Republic + 25% of 1.8m NI is still less than 25% of Republic (FG) or 24% (FF). In fairness, SF is just a whisker behind FF, but “largest party in Ireland”? Sounds like someone had one or two snifters too many during the 1916 celebrations.

  • Msiegnaro

    Gerry as Easter, I was expecting some nice antidotes about him around a log fire telling stories and eating Easter eggs – very disappointed.

  • Msiegnaro

    As in Sinn Fein are the only party that offer something different and vibrant while all others offer more of the same.

  • Dominic Hendron

    Connolly didn’t want a shot fired in the north, the vast majority of the Belfast volunteers went with the IPP, Pearse surrendered honourably in order to prevent further lose of life; including the volunteers. Who said the provos could bomb the heart out of every town in the north, increasing sectarian division and claiming to be the inheritors of 1916?

  • Gopher

    The bit on the Fresh Start agreement is hilarious

  • SeaanUiNeill

    “In conclusion, I want to single out the contribution of women in our struggle.”

    I am always astonished that GA can still feel he has any grounds to speak of “Women” after what has been made public about his stance on what happened to his neice Áine and with the Máiría Cahill, to whom he said, as she reported him, regarding the manipulativeness of abusers, “‘Sometimes they’re that manipulative’, that the people who have been abused actually enjoy it.”

    As Dominic Hendron suggests below, who is GA to tell us about 1916.

  • Glenn

  • Charlie Farlie

    One question for all the naysayers.
    Has any other leader on the island of Ireland spent as long highlighting the aim of equality in the Proclamation, or for that matter, addressed the poison of sectarianism as directly as GA has over the last few months? Awaiting all the examples and quotations below.

  • Ben De Hellenbacque
  • Brendan Heading

    Sinn Féin haven’t addressed the poison of sectarianism at any point in their existence.

  • Glenn

    I suppose he was torchbearer for addressing sectarianism when he carried the coffin of provo Thomas Begley. When Begley and his provo accomplices brought mass sectarian murder to the working class people of the Shankill. Begley’s coffin being one of many he has carried and never apologise for, made excuses for but never apologised for. And Sinn Fein/IRA were front and central when they unveiled a memorial to this sectarian killer on the 20th anniversary of the atrocity.

  • Charlie Farlie

    Completely wrong Brendan, your just saying what you want to be the case, over what factually is the case. Just have a look at this speech for a start re sectarianism.

  • Charlie Farlie

    Read my post again Glenn and answer my very direct question. I’m speaking about a timeframe over the centenary commemorations. I’m concerned with the here and now, looking to the past will not provide a better future for my children and I am attracted by those speaking against sectarianism now and promoting equality now, rather than events in a war that hopefully will never be repeated. Now please look at my question again with the present in mind.

  • Brendan Heading

    Just so that I understand something. When you say “address sectarianism” you mean making a speech about it ? I thought you might have been referring to their actions on the ground and/or in government.

  • Jollyraj

    If that be the case, I think SF have also ‘addressed’ equal opportunities for Protestants in all areas where they wield influence.

  • Msiegnaro

    Is that not what’s taken to remove poison? Apologies if I’ve got it wrong.

  • Jollyraj

    Antidotes to the toxic nature of his past, one could read that as, I guess. The grim spectre of The Beard trampolining with his dog is surely designed as shop’s own cough syrup to treat the lung cancer of so many people across the country believing that GA directed a sectarian murder campaign.

  • Jollyraj

    Adams at Easter, hmm? Sortae an infernal parody of the Queen’s speech. One wonders what possible appeal this man, who could in another age have been a mere footnote, a sort of Rolf Harris of Irish politics, could possibly have to the average Irish voter.

  • Nevin

    Gerry (and others) might like to reflect on these sentiments expressed by Martha Craig, another of my heroes, delivered during a lecture in late 1900 in Toronto:

    The Ojibway tribe has adopted the religion of Hiawatha, and they believe that they must never tell a lie, virtue must be prized above all things, and that no living thing must be despised.

    Back in 1896, Martha was a member of the Henry Joy McCracken Literary Society. She could deliver recitations as well as ‘a sumptuous tea’.

  • SeaanUiNeill

    Charlie, respectfully, while I am entirely aware that we must live in the present, that present is entirely constructed out of memory, out of that sense of the past that you are easily dismissing. Only those who have lost their engagement with the past through amnesia or, even more tragically, Alzheimers disease are living entirely in the present. Unless we deal in an adult and honest way with the implications of the past, we are shirking responsibility. I have been pulled over the symbolic coals on Slugger this last week for upbrading Unionism about shirking its culpability for re-introducing physical force in place of constitutional debate with their militarisation of the Home Rule argument in 1912. No slack, no special pleading can excuse that culpabilityy, but neither can it excuse GSs actual behaviour to flesh and blood women who looked to him to make good justice in a situation where they had been physically abused. How can one credit words about “woman” in general, or about any aspect of practical social justice, when the person speaking those words has acted so very differently when confronted with an actual instance to test his sincerity and been found utterly wanting.

    I also want justice, credible social and economic equality and an utter end to sectarianism, and have lived for this since I marched for civil rights here almost fifty years ago, but I want to be able to trust that it is not simply a matter of fine words with no substance when it is actually tested in the real world where real people live outside of ideology.

  • Gopher

    What is anyone going to do about it? I admit I did roll around laughing at it, the speech. Gerry has practically given any rational party of a nationalist bent, the wood, the nails and the rope to build a political gallows for him and SF. But the problem is Seaan he mentions 1916 and as we have seen, take a nationalist politician out of his comfort zone like President Higgins and they run scared. At least Higgins has somewhere to hide. Where are the SDLP gonna hide at the assembly elections? Gerry gives himself and the IRA credit for everything. In that speech SF have done everything except cure Cancer.. If he made that speech in Dublin Michael Martin would have been over it like a rash. But outside Southern Ireland you wont hear a word. Why? Because he mentions 1916 and the SDLP wanted to hide behind unionists as much as Higgins did, If I was a nationalist politician I would have people rolling in the asiles with a parody of that speech.

  • Nevin
  • Granni Trixie

    you must be kiddin’.

  • Granni Trixie

    I have made this point often before on Slugger: failure to recognise sectarianism is part of the problem which sustains this cultural faultline. But when talks about it above he obviously does not see the moat in his own eye and has no moral authority to lecture the rest of us.

  • Granni Trixie

    GA sees “the establishment” of which he has been assimilated into as ‘other.’ Doesn’t he see how foolish he sounds? Words are cheap.

  • Glenn

    All that rhetoric from Adams last Sunday, when he lectured us all on everything from women’s rights, healing hurts and ending divisions to sectarianism, he stated, “But there is much yet to be done. Hurts must be healed. Divisions ended”.

    Today at Glasnevin cemetery when his party could have put into action some of his words they failed miserably, again showing themselves to be the hate filled sectarian bigots they are. The ceremony to unveil a memorial wall with all the names of those who died in conflicts between 1916-1923 took place however, the Sinn Fein/IRA lord mayor of Dublin could not attend, nor did any other Sinn Fein/IRA personnel.
    Empty rhetoric Sunday, by Gerry Adams.

    http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/lord-mayor-of-dublin-absent-from-glasnevin-cemetery-ceremony-1.2596896

  • Zig70

    SF linking the freedom of Ireland to a socialist agenda in what he admits are conservative states just illustrates why their project will falter. Their inability to coalesce with other nationalists of different political viewpoints makes them the greatest barrier to achieving a united Ireland.

  • Charlie Farlie

    Sean, respectfully, it is entirely because I don’t suffer from amnesia that I am speaking about the emphasis on the present. I lost my grandfather in the troubles so therefore there is not the will or the want to ‘dismiss’ as you say, any analysis of our past. I know what it means to grieve but I will tell you In all honesty that my desire for my children to grow in a place where that analysis starts to dissipate to a place where there is understanding on both sides, takes precedence over my desire for historic post mortems. If any protagonist wishes to speak of the future with equality and non sectarianism as their aim, I am willing to listen precisely because of my grief, not in spite of it. My children deserve the childhood that was denied us. I’m not going to bury my head in the sand and wait until some form of justice to be served waiting for it to happen. Let’s do it now, and if Gerry Adams is speaking positively regarding the future, I will support it. The past has to end somewhere, not forgotten but not shaping the future.

  • Charlie Farlie

    So SF werent the architects of Section 75, the strongest equality legislation in the Western World? Does that not ensure equality for all? Have they not actively attended many events that would be problematic for many of their electorate, in order to illustrate their conciliatory approach to Unionists? They also embedded in their approach to a United Ireland the importance of ensuring that Unionist representation in any All Ireland initiative would be one where their traditions and backgrounds are wholly respected? Now please illustrate where these initiatives have been reciprocated? I could go on, and I have illustrated examples. You just don’t want to see them.

  • Charlie Farlie

    Same applies to Nelson Mandela then so?

  • SeaanUiNeill

    Charlie, I entirely understand your wish for peace. I’ve never supported any violence from any side, and believe that had civil disobedience been used at all times, as the early Irish Irelanders fully planned, far more could have been achieved in Ireland in the twentieth century than has been from violence. But, going on his actions, I simply cannot believe that Gerry Adams is someone who can deliver more than rhetoric.

    This is not a matter of historic post mortems or of one part of our community scoring moral (or rhetorical) points against the other. Its a matter of his personal credibility, the foundation of how anyone should be judged in political life. While I entirely agree with you, “let’s do it now”, GA, with his track record on womens issues, one that speaks most eloquently of an inability to deliver on two women standing in front of him, simply cannot inspire any thinking person who seriously wants more than words with any confidance. As someone who has known a number of friends who have suffered sexual abuse, one of whom committed suicide, GAs aparent support for the abusers rather than the survivors particularly grates against the aspirational words of his speech. I simply cannot even begin to believe that Gerry Adams is a person who can be trusted to deliver a better world for our children. But then that is something only we ourselves can do.

    If we want a community with equality and non-sectarianism as its aim, we really have to do it ourselves, from the grass roots up. Like our personal intellegence, equality and non-sectarianism cannot be simply delivered, they certainly cannot be compelled by a state, although their opposites, inequality and sectarianism, can be inhibited a little. But these are things each and every one of us needs to commit to in our actual lives, and in our relationships with others across our entire community. We have developed bad habits of imagining that politicians can in some way achieve these things for us, but a better society is something only we ourselves can strive for. And if we really need to have politicians to reassure us that these things are being organised for us, at least let them be able to point to a record that proves that they can deliver (at the very least within their family) and accordingly we can trust them to deliver on our behalf.

  • Granni Trixie

    I thought that that old chestnut had been laid to rest namely that SA bears no comparison to NI situation. And its an insult to appropriate Nelson Mandela to try to benefit GA. Infact Adrian Guilke from SA (and QUB) in 1990s wrote that comparisons of this nature are a problem in analysing the conflict here.

  • Sir Rantsalot

    He hasn’t addressed anything directly. Saying the word equality over and over is not addressing any issues at all. Same with the S word. He has done nothing. People with 2 or more brain cells know this…

  • Charlie Farlie

    Laid to rest by and for whom? Would that not be considered subjective opinion or have I entered a facist parallel universe?

  • Barneyt

    Are you sure you cant come up with any parallels whatsoever between NI and SA. Whilst it was perhaps not as extreme as SA, the conditions and many of the events and triggers for protest are similar.

  • Barneyt

    As near as damn it. FF and FG would perhaps have compromised and united to form a government, would it not have cemented SF as the official opposition.

  • Brendan Heading

    So SF werent the architects of Section 75, the strongest equality legislation in the Western World?

    Yes, that’s correct. SF weren’t the architects of Section 75. Section 75 of the Northern Ireland Act 1998 (a British Act of Parliament) was part of the outcome of the Good Friday Agreement negotiations, within which SF was one out of 9 negotiating parties, and one of the least consequential in the talks. Northern Ireland has had the strongest equality legislation in the western world since the 1970s.

    Does that not ensure equality for all?

    No, it doesn’t. Gay people still aren’t allowed to get married and women aren’t allowed to have abortions.

    Have they not actively attended many events that would be problematic for many of their electorate, in order to illustrate their conciliatory approach to Unionists?

    Sure they have. They also murdered somewhere in the region of 2000 people, the larger number of them being Protestants. Turning up at a couple of uncomfortable events doesn’t cancel all that out.

    Now please illustrate where these initiatives have been reciprocated? I could go on, and I have illustrated examples. You just don’t want to see them.

    I’m not suggesting that these moves have been reciprocated, just challenging this idea that SF’s tokenism amounts to a serious effort to address sectarianism. SF aren’t interested in ending sectarianism, never have been. For example, SF have been bitterly fighting any attempt to move more kids into integrated schools. A party which thinks that Protestant and Catholic children should be educated separately is not one that is interested in ending sectarianism.

  • Brendan Heading

    I suspect you’re a recent visitor from the other parallel universe where an organisation that blew up civilians and murdered nearly 2000 people is entitled to be credited with being dedicated to ending sectarianism.

  • aquifer

    Why should I believe anything he says? I didn’t read a word and will live longer that way.

  • Jollyraj

    “To be credited with being dedicated to ending sectarianism.”

    To be fair, they did relent a bit. Sort of like Al Capone going on a long vacation and demanding the credit for a downturn in criminality.

  • Charlie Farlie

    Thats right Brendan, people in this part of the world secretly wanted a criminal empire, so they just thought out of the blue one day, hey, I’m going to start a violent campaign for no reason whatsoever! If my reply seems infantile, it is no less so than your singling out one side of the outcome, and completely ignoring any context whatsoever. And you’re pontificating on sectarianism when you can so idly choose only some of the victims to highlight? Just because this conversation is regarding SF, it does no service to the argument of equality by ignoring the context. You don’t have to agree with its mechanisations, but it can’t really be ignored now can it?

  • Charlie Farlie

    Brendan, you’re telling me that Section 75 wasn’t a major part of SF’s pre-requisites going into negotiations? Sure the other Nationalist party would have been happy with that beacon of equality called Sunningdale (head in hands).

    Gay Marriage and The issue of abortion have been placed for legislation multiple times by SF only to be castigated and thrown out by other parties. They are the leading party on these issues – not a good example on your part!

    You agree with me that SF have been the leading protagonists in conciliatory approaches toward Unionists, but then you go back again to talking about the troubles. I do believe that SF were a part of attempting to end this sorry period. Whilst not ignoring their participation in it, it had to be brought to an end politically which they did and I understand you cannot forgive their culpability but I assumed that at the end of any conflict, numerous parties have to take the onus to change. What you’re essentially saying is that it doesn’t matter what they do, you will never forgive them. And that is fine, but don’t try to make your argument by cherrypicking only what suits and ignoring any other relevant fact. And by the way, wanting children to be brought up in a Catholic denominational school is not a sectarian issue but a faith based one. This argument bears no merit whatsoever as other countries have faith based schools and they live perfectly in peace so again, a moot point!

  • Charlie Farlie

    I don’t really think it was in Mr Capone’s interests to have a downturn in criminality. I don’t recall him spending nearly 30 years of his life trying to end gang culture in America. Damn that American propagandist media for not informing us of all the facts.

  • Charlie Farlie

    You may have aspirations of grandeur Sir, but with such derogatory discourse as yours I hasten to guess your career in the aristocracy may be short lived. Oh wait thats right, they encourage hierarchical buffoonery in their membership and ranks – bravo, you have found your rightful menage.

  • Jollyraj

    Hmm..my comparison is between Capone and Adams. I am unsure who you are talking about.

  • chrisjones2

    ….as the leader of a deeply sectarian Discriminatory and misogynistic party perhaps he needs to say less and do more

  • chrisjones2

    Yes he speaks positively about equality. He was even more positive when he proposed last year to weaponise it against the unionist bastards. …but that was inside the party not intended for public consumption

  • chrisjones2

    …and didn’t they just use a petition of concern to stop the discrimination against Protestants teaching in catholic schools?

    And oppose the merger of Stranmillis and St Mary’s lest Carholic hegemony in education be contaminated?

  • chrisjones2

    Well they did actually when the old IRA saw the civil rights movement as a vehicle to revive their campaign

  • chrisjones2

    ….. It’s more deep seated than drink

    To be foolish enough to vote SF out of conscious thought your ability to do basic maths, understand basic economics and analyse Gerrys speeches has to be limited

  • chrisjones2

    Well he did in Chicago ….ask Bugs Moran

  • Charlie Farlie

    So there was no context of discrimination of any kind in the 50’s and 60’s? They just thought randomly lets hijack this civil rights campaign for the sole purpose of making us the criminal badasses? The old IRA did not emerge in a vacuum any more than other protagonists including Loyalist ones.

  • Charlie Farlie

    But Chris that’s the problem. Even though I have provided actionable examples of outreach the real issue is that people cannot forgive GA for what he was involved in. As I said before that’s fine, I can even understand that emotion, but to try and paper over that by saying he hasn’t done anything to try to end sectarianism is quite frankly incorrect. Again I’ll say, just because you want something to be so, doesn’t mean it is. The fact is that it wouldn’t matter if GA bent on all fours, laid out his hand and yelped at the feet of Unionism, it still wouldn’t be enough because of who he is and the past. Again that’s fine, but call it what it is instead of non-truths, he has addressed sectarianism, he has reached out to Unionism and he has stood up to those in his own community who wish to propagate more sectarianism. You don’t have to like him to grudgingly admit this.

  • Rory Carr

    Great find, Nevin. But of course it only whets our appetite for more.

  • Nevin

    Just click on the image and click on Run Kerry Run for some more about Martha; she was some woman!

    PS Check out the 1694 map of Coleraine.

  • Brendan Heading

    They sure did. No idea what Charlie is on about TBH ..

  • Brendan Heading

    neither unionism nor nationalism have addressed sectarianism as they both rely on it for their continued existence.

    But I was pointing this out to the dude above who suggested that somehow SF were actually doing something about the problem. They aren’t.

  • Brendan Heading

    Brendan, you’re telling me that Section 75 wasn’t a major part of SF’s pre-requisites going into negotiations?

    No, I was rebutting your false claim that SF were solely or substantially responsible for the introduction of Section 75.

    Gay Marriage and The issue of abortion have been placed for legislation multiple times by SF

    This is incorrect. SF have never “placed” any abortion Iegislation, or any legislation relating to gay marriage.

    only to be castigated and thrown out by other parties. They are the leading party on these issues – not a good example on your part!

    I was rebutting your claim that Section 75 guaranteed equality for all. It doesn’t. If it did, it would not be necessary for SF to have these motions in the assembly.

    You agree with me that SF have been the leading protagonists in conciliatory approaches toward Unionists, but then you go back again to talking about the troubles

    I don’t think I do agree with you. I’m not of the view that a man deserves praise if he stops beating his wife.

    What you’re essentially saying is that it doesn’t matter what they do, you will never forgive them.

    No, what I’m actually – never mind essentially – saying is that your claims about SF’s role in politics here are substantially exaggerated or false.

  • Brendan Heading

    Charlie, I think you need a lie down.

  • Charlie Farlie

    Ah you disappoint me Brendan, I thought you could concoct a firmer reproachment. Not to be?

  • Charlie Farlie

    And I’m illustrating to you that your personal distaste for SF and GA will never allow you to view their actions objectively or for that matter impartially. This is illustrated to a large extent in your replies. If you separate emotions from critical analysis you may come to the view that your partiality is preventing you from engaging in the latter, and you’re not the only one I might add. We differ in that I believe people can change, you don’t. Essentially we will have to agree to differ on this one.

  • Brendan Heading

    I’ve made factual assertions. If they’re not objective, go ahead and refute them.

  • Charlie Farlie

    Its interesting to me, from a sociological point of view the amount of personal invective that persuades people’s ability to critically evaluate fact. When people have their minds made up in this place, there really is no progression of movement beyond personal emotion. I have no issue with people having difficulty with GA’s, and SF if they would just be honest and say that, instead of trying to somehow academically justify their emotional opinion by ignoring fact and engaging in inaccurate revisionism. Quite frightening that progression is still being halted due to emotional, rather than practical analysis.

  • Charlie Farlie

    Is it a factual assertion for me to say that you believe that people cannot fundamentally change?

  • Brendan Heading

    No it isn’t. I believe SF have fundamentally changed. I do not believe that means they can credibly claim they are serious about addressing sectarianism.

  • Brendan Heading

    there’s nothing to rebut Charlie. I’m happy to leave your reply above as is, as I think it speaks for itself.

  • Charlie Farlie

    Again, this is a faith based issue. Why are faith based issues classed as sectarian, when they fall within religious practice? So if someone chooses to go to mass instead of church, is that sectarian aswell or do you expect one to travel around 7 churches in the locality every sunday just to not seem sectarian? So you believe that parents shouldn’t have the choice over what ethos their children are taught? Then tell the other global countries that have faith based education that they are sectarian, they will look at you with bewilderment.

  • Charlie Farlie

    I have rebuttal for each of your points but I wonder, will it get beyond semantics. Did the SDLP insist on Section 75? Are SF the leading party in the Gay Rights and Abortion area? Section 75 does not legislate for Gay marriage or abortion, it is legislation relating to equality of opportunity in the area of employment, which is what I meant in my first point but again, semantics.

  • Brendan Heading

    I’m sorry. I know I’m supposed to be grateful that I can go out at night without being shot or blown up. But I think I have a right to expect other basic things, like the country being run properly, and an end to this constant Truman Show esque fishbowl we live in where we’re constantly going round and round arguing about the same rubbish all the time.

  • Charlie Farlie

    Thats an oxymoron Brendan. If you believe they have fundamentally changed, how so?

  • Brendan Heading

    By defending the practice of educating children separately based on their religion, you’re reinforcing my point that you’re not serious about addressing sectarianism.

  • Charlie Farlie

    Ok, so by your reasoning, if I as a parent want my children taught through a faith based system, then my only raison d’être is sectarianism? ha, it really gets better! A pretty bold statement to make from someone who is supposedly a supporter of non-discrimination don’t you think?

  • Brendan Heading

    No, that isn’t my reasoning, or anything like it. This is my last reply to you – I’m not going to waste time trying to reason along the lines of reductio ad absurdum. Good night.

  • Charlie Farlie

    You may not like to admit it, but it was your assertion that support for faith based education means one is not serious about sectarianism. I don’t know about reductio ad absurdum, but that was almost verbatim. Good night Brendan.

  • Charlie Farlie

    Ha, very good GF2, I especially like that last line. Your subtlety is admirable in the face of disappearing posts. 😉

  • Charlie Farlie

    Totally agree! I would hope for positive progression but its not happening anytime soon.

    I also agree that SF is not immune to criticism, I can do that with ease and have done. But I would assume critical observation based on fact is an integral part of what is supposedly a modern day state, unfortunately this is not one and we have too far to go.