Slugger O'Toole

Conversation, politics and stray insights

Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?

Tue 4 February 2014, 4:02am

Perhaps it says more about my prejudices than anyone else’s but If I had to bet, I’d wager that many Belfast Telegraph Editorial Page readers understand the concept of integrated education as both simple and agreeable.

The simple part: Abolish CCMS, i.e. Catholic schools.

The agreeable part: Assimilate Catholic students into the Northern Ireland’s version of British state schools and, hey presto, that’s sectarianism largely sorted.

As someone who favors at least some concept of integrated education – though not at the price of massive social experiments, or the outright ending of freedom of choice for parents – such an approach vexes and not only because of its obvious sectarianism. It’s the uncritical laziness propping up such a smug outlook that gets me.

Self-confident self-reverence – the key social goal of Northern Ireland’s grammar system – is a dangerous habit at the best of times; employing this trait in a debate about education reform is as risible as it is unhelpful.

Such contented condescension and passive aggressive pity for ‘the other lot’ is far from one-way traffic in Belfast. After all, isn’t attaining this very disposition more or less the theological goal of CCMS’ much vaunted ethos?

All of which is just a convoluted way of saying what everyone already knows. Breaking news: Deeply divided society is divided over root causes of division; The two main groups tend to attribute sectarian attitudes as more deeply entrenched and problematic in the other group.

My point is this. This week’s news of a secondary school teacher fleeing her post at a Belfast school following threats from a coalition of the usual suspects is attracting all the wrong questions.

For example, praise and coverage has rightly focused on the decency of the Boys’ Model’s pupils’ supportive response. Some attention will inevitably focus on the identities and “grievances” of the merry band of unelected sidewalk gatherers whose diligence in finding new sources of perceived oppression may have been better applied to the classrooms they now profess to care so deeply about.

Some attention may even meander its way to eventually asking why the threats have not been condemned in a more full-throated chorus of ecumenical unity. But all of that is to miss what the Americans like to call, quite fittingly in this case, “a teachable moment”.

The Model Boys incident has presented an opportunity to frame the integrated education debate in the necessarily uncomfortable terms that are long overdue. Are we even serious about integrated education, or not?

Should threatening teachers whose political identity feels threatening emerge as a pattern, then the prospects for real and far-reaching integrated education taking off will quickly crash against yet another brick in the north’s entrenched sectarian walls.

Yet integrated education faces a more corrosive and formidable threat than the worst the Facebook fascists are capable of. We simply need to listen, even casually, to the softer tones of Belfast’s more polite suburbs to hear the greatest threat any sustainable vision of integrated education continues to face: the quietly potent and under-examined prejudices of Northern Ireland’s middle classes.

How many unionist parents would be happy to have their kids taught English Literature, or cultural and arts classes, by elected representatives of Sinn Fein or the SDLP?

How many middle-class liberal Catholics are willing to have their kids taught the history of the state by members of the Orange Order or the UUP?

How many people who “support integrated education” are content for a radical overhaul of the secondary school curriculum?

What should inform, guide, and monitor the process for agreeing the newly integrated lessons’ focus and emphasis? Is the imprimatur of a Nelson McCausland type appropriate or, worse, necessary? How about the blessing of Catholic hierarchy? Everyone okay with that?

If your answer is that educational priorities must come before politics then what are we even talking about in the first place?

Belief in integrated education is thrown around like a badge of honour for the “right-thinking” classes.

It could be a noble concept and goal, sure – at least for those who don’t see it as political cleansing by stealth and assimilation.

But is not the reason we have moved so little towards large-scale integration because, not-so-deep down, most of us don’t really want to integrate much at all?

When former SDLP negotiator Sean Farren asked former UUP leader David Trimble what he wanted for “his people”, during the talks leading up to Good Friday’s Belfast Agreement, Trimble is reported to have said, “to be left alone”.

I once read Trimble’s answer as hopelessly irresponsible and, given the tiny size of the place, completely unrealistic.

But perhaps Trimble was onto how many of us see each other. We’ll gladly live peacefully, and even on equal terms, but, in the end, separately.

Most people may not be bigots but how many of us take an active interest in the past-times and perspectives of our neighbours? If we were serious about integrated education, wouldn’t we be starting right there?

I hope not but the contrary evidence is hardly encouraging.

To date, the report card assessing the bona fides of Northern Ireland’s professed support for integrated education reads: “Few marks: Too little contribution to class discussion.”

Share 'Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?' on Delicious Share 'Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?' on Digg Share 'Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?' on Facebook Share 'Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?' on Google+ Share 'Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?' on LinkedIn Share 'Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?' on Pinterest Share 'Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?' on reddit Share 'Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?' on StumbleUpon Share 'Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?' on Twitter Share 'Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?' on Add to Bookmarks Share 'Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?' on Email Share 'Is integrated education even possible in Northern Ireland?' on Print Friendly

Comments (130)

  1. DoppiaVu (profile) says:

    “My God, the self satisfied stupidity of the centro-fascists.”

    Right, so wanting to give kids the chance to be able to make their own minds up about other kids before their beliefs have been poisoned is called centro-fascism? What planet are you on?

    Oh yes and Harry’s example is very amusing, and a clear case in favour of making sure that all kids are kept in their own little ghettos, where various embittered elders can poison their minds without fear of ever being challenged by the harsh fact that actually, themuns are pretty much the same as our’uns.

    It’s all part of a sad process of de-humanising the other side. It’s so much easier to put a brick through someone’s window (or worse) when you don’t view them as being the same species as you.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  2. Pete Rock (profile) says:

    I went to the Boys Model in the 90′s, very proud that pupils there took a very mature and reasonable attitude in coming out in support of Catherine Seeley.

    I can also understand the concern of parents after reading her interview on the Sinn Fein website, someone participating in commemorations for IRA terrorists is hardly going to endear themselves to parents from Loyalist areas.

    You have to ask was it wise to have that interview online especially given its content?

    Would Winston Irvine (if he was a teacher) be any more welcome in La Salle in West Belfast?

    I suppose issues like this need thrashed out one way or the other if this part of the World is going to continue to intergrate, whether that be though the medium of schools or otherwise.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 1
  3. Barnshee (profile) says:

    DD
    “Just as I was talking about the lack of bitterness or sectarian hatred on the thread, along comes Barnshee to disprove me – sheesh, isn’t it always the way !”

    In what way are facts sectarian ?

    Please dispute the facts

    117,000 prods gone from city side yes /no
    2 Foyle College gone to “waterside” yes/no
    3 Foyle pupils attacked on public transport yes /no
    4 /Derry almost entirely dependant of public sector jobs and benefit payments yes/no

    “Carnhill, Galliagh, Shantallow, Ballymagroarty, Creggan, The Brandywell, The Bogside” -says it all

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 1
  4. Barnshee (profile) says:

    Repeats

    The “Roman catholic” community have carefully fenced off their (british tax payer funded) education system for themselves -to expect participation of the remainder is a best greed -to arrive in a School as representative of a body closely connected to a murder gang whose victims include past pupils is a brass neck beyond brass necks.

    I suspect the school was were unaware of the teachers full “CV” before her employment

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 1
  5. Turgon (profile) says:

    Pete Rock,
    I think that is a very fair comment and that part of the thread has been a bit neglected.

    Threats to Ms. Seeley are completely wrong. She does not appear to have broken any laws (certainly not in school) and is most unlikely to have breached any professional standards. As such threats are unacceptable.

    Appearing on the internet and promoting a very one sided analysis is unlikely to be wise if one works in an area where one has major, prolonged and influential contact in mixed or “the other side’s” company.

    Not that that for a moment justifies the threats to Ms. Seeley. She has maybe been a little naive.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  6. BluesJazz (profile) black spot says:

    Which brings me back to a questioned posed earlier.

    Are schools and colleges still (in the 21st century) excluded from Fair Employment legislation?

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  7. PaddyReilly (profile) says:

    Wanting to give kids the chance to be able to make their own minds up about other kids before their beliefs have been poisoned

    1) The Catholic School system does not set out to ‘poison the beliefs’ of its charges, and would take great offence at your implying that it does so;
    2) That you use this terminology says more about you;
    3) Children, in my experience, are very adept at ignoring the ethos that their school tries to impose on them and instead adopting the ethos of the society around them.

    In a lot of cases, the problem is that the segregation is in force before the child gets to school, because of the lack of neighbours’ children of the other sort. This is the problem that one does not find in France, England or America. So it isn’t the schools.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  8. Turgon (profile) says:

    BluesJazz ,
    My understanding was that they are indeed (excluded from fair employment). I think about 10% of the teaching staff at my state grammar school was Catholic in the 1980s: I have no idea if that was typical or what sort of figures would apply today.

    I do tremember one teching practice student taking our class (maybe 3rd or 4th year). She had us do some sort of presentation about the gun running of 1912 and she stated that if it was okay then so was the current IRA campaign. I did not bother to tell my parents but someone must have as she ended up having to apologise to the class.

    That was the only remotely political thing I remember that said. I am not sure if Prod students did or now do teaching practice routinely in Catholic schools nor what the percentage of Protestant teachers was or is now in Catholic schools.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  9. Barnshee (profile) says:

    BJ

    Are schools and colleges still (in the 21st century) excluded from Fair Employment legislation

    Yes -Religious grounds exclusion still exists

    (EG complaint -”They never gave me a teaching job because I was a prod/mick”-such appeals to Tribunals are not regarded as tenable under current legislation)

    This does not mean that any school CANNOT employ who they want It just means that contributing to the “catholic ethos” thing effectively ring fences the Roman Catholic schools for Roman Catholic teachers and FE legislation encourages it.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  10. Barnshee (profile) says:

    “I am not sure if Prod students did or now do teaching practice routinely in Catholic schools”

    Nope Prod goes to prod and mick to mick

    ” what the percentage of Protestant teachers was or is now in Catholic schools.”

    I suggest you use an electron microscope in you research if want to find out.

    (PS FOI `s will not help I tried)

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  11. PaddyReilly (profile) says:

    117,000 prods gone from city side yes /no

    The 2001 census revealed 12,692 Catholics and 159 Protestants in the Cityside ward: http://www.ark.ac.uk/elections/lgderry.htm

    So the story that 117,000 protestants once lived there strikes me as implausible in the extreme. So no.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  12. Barnshee (profile) says:

    “So the story that 117,000 protestants once lived there strikes me as implausible in the extreme. So no.”

    1 You are quoting 1 ward –check all the wards
    2 and choosing 2001 ?
    3 Compare with previous censuses back to 1968 (when the flight out started

    If time permits I suggest you also should look at the shift in business ownership in the city -examine particularly how the Republican bombing campaign seemed to miss Roman catholic enterprises mysteriously funny that

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  13. DoppiaVu (profile) says:

    PaddyReilly

    You can dry your eyes about my anti-Catholic School comments, seeing as there haven’t been any in any of my posts.

    But your various other comments perfectly illustrate why kids need to meet other kids from outside their own communities, so thank you for that.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  14. derrydave (profile) says:

    Barnshee,

    You are a perfect example of the type of idiot that blights NI – rant and rave and castigate the other side whilst taking a few facts and exaggerating them beyond all belief to suit your biggotted, bitter, beliefs. Quite apt for this thread I suppose in that it’s people like you who we are all discussing in talking about the failures of our education system. A little education could certainly do a lot for you ! So, in answer to your points:

    1. The Protestant flight from the West bank of Derry was quite a complex phenomenon, with multiple causes – something you would be aware of if you read a little bit about the history. Plain ridiculous to claim that 17,000 prods were bombed out of the Westbank – but I guess you know that.

    2/3. Foyle College moved to the Waterside for the very straightforward reason that most of it’s pupils come from there – not due to widespread attacks on pupils. Were some pupils attacked from time to time, yeah I’m sure they were. As a past pupil of the College, I can testify that we were often attacked by pupils from St Joes (as we shared a bus with them) – shit happens ! There was absolutely not any widespread campaign against Foyle students – to claim there was is simply disingenuous (sp?).

    4. Derry City is not completely dependant on the civil service or the dole – like most of NI there is a level of dependance (certainly more than is healthy), however the private sector has undoubtedly grown very significantly over the years, and will continue to do so.

    And re your point on the business ownership in Derry – it is also rather telling I’d suggest that there was next to no Catholic-owned businesses in the City Centre pre 1970 – kind of made it likely that protestant-owned businesses would be impacted by any city-centre bombing. Times have changed however – Derry is a majority CNR city and will always remain so – as such it’s pretty obvious that most of the non-multi-national businesses will be owned / run by people who are at least nominally catholic.

    Apologies to all for sidetracking what was a really interesting discussion – sometimes however you have got to respond to even the most idiotic of trolls.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  15. PaddyReilly (profile) says:

    In 1961 the population of the County Borough of Londonderry was 53,762, and of these only 42,052 lived West of the river.

    http://www.nisra.gov.uk/archive/census/1961/londonderry_county_borough_report.pdf (page 18)

    So I think we can rule out 117,000 Protestants exiting from that area.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  16. PaddyReilly (profile) says:

    Looking at your original post I see you wrote 117,000 Protestants gone from the city side but you probably meant to write 1) 17,000 Protestants gone from the city side.

    I will leave the analysis of this revised figure to Derrydave. But it is true that the 1970s in Northern Ireland saw the largest peacetime movement of people since World War 2 and that Catholics suffered from this phenomenon proportionately more than Protestants did.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  17. qwerty12345 (profile) says:

    Most entertaining, on a thread about education Barnshee is actually gettting some.

    Nice.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  18. Charles_Gould (profile) says:

    I don’t think any of us should be happy about the segregated nature where the river Doyle divides the people of the city by religion….I think a major integrated housing initiative is needed on the West Bank, where equal numbers of each religion are accommodated in a number if “beacon” housing schemes, that bring religious groups together.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  19. galloglaigh (profile) says:

    Loyalists don’t want Catholic education, nor would it seem Catholics educating. Makes you wonder what type of state we’d live in had loyalism no been kicked into touch by croppies who wouldn’t lie down!

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  20. PaddyReilly (profile) says:

    where the river Doyle divides the people of the city by religion

    The Doyle is a new river on me.

    Actually there are very few Protestants West of the Foyle, whereas East of the Foyle is fairly evenly mixed.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  21. Red Cortina (profile) says:

    Shared Education should not be forced, which is what seems to be happening. Look at the education complex being mooted in the news this week at Lisanelly in Omagh. Hailed as a bastion of shared education, it’s actually two different forms of education that happen to be in the same area. Side by side; nothing shared about it.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  22. Barnshee (profile) says:

    PR
    “So I think we can rule out 117,000 Protestants exiting from that area.”

    Read my post carefully the item in listed 1-2-3 etc
    The figure is 17000

    DD
    “1. The Protestant flight from the West bank of Derry was quite a complex phenomenon, with multiple causes – something you would be aware of if you read a little bit about the history. Plain ridiculous to claim that 17,000 prods were bombed out of the Westbank – but I guess you know that.”

    Since my family is part of the flight I am fully appraised of it- You will note I also include intimidation and boycott.

    “I’d suggest that there was next to no Catholic-owned businesses in the City Centre pre 1970 ” -Bollocks theHassons empire and -the LEP- the place littered with Catholic owned bars But its OK to bomb the prod?

    “Foyle College moved to the Waterside for the very straightforward reason that most of it’s pupils come from there ”

    Foyle College moved to new premises in the city side at a time when there was a substantial prod population on the city side Crawford square Northland Road Morningside etc Hardly the act of a school without a local catchment area
    now-all gone– East

    (The “new” Foyle school is now occupied by a Roman catholic school).

    Foyle College moved to the Waterside for the very straightforward reason that most of it’s pupils parents had fled there.

    “rant and rave and castigate the other side whilst taking a few facts and exaggerating them beyond all belief to suit your biggotted, bitter, beliefs”

    Facts- facts as Corporal Jones says “they don’t like it up em”

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  23. Hopping The Border (profile) says:

    It would appear that some contributors have misunderstood my point on assimilation rather than integration.

    I am all for integrated education provided it is actually so and it maintains high academic standards. However, there is at least a significant minority within the PUL that through at least one of ignorance, willful misdirection or bigotry appear to be under the assumption that the exposure of their children to Irish culture, sport, language and historical and geographical knowledge beyond the border will result in them being somehow less British.

    Frankly I find it astonishing the lack of historical and geographical knowledge many of my state educated friends have of Ireland – it is as if they were taught in a world where Northern Ireland had literally detached itself from Ireland and had been welded to Great Britain.

    Allied to this, the majority unionists parties calling for “integrated education” are populated with uber anti-anything irish men such as Tom “build a big fence around the border” Elliot and Sammy “leprechaun language” Wilson. Thus the record of the Northern Irish state in attempting to suppress anything Irish (even to this day an Irish language act is a step too far for unionists, even where minority languages are legislated for elsewhere in the UK) coupled with the current calibre of unionist politicians does not seem indicative of a truly integrated system being possible any time in the near future.

    As for those positing the futility of learning Irish in the modern world, I have rarely had the need to recite Shakespeare or Wordsworth or employ calculus, trigonometry or geometry. However, studying all of those and more provides a well rounded education. The same applies to Irish. Of course it may not be immediately useful to all careers yet even a cursory study of the island’s indigenous language allows a student a greater understanding of the island and its people.

    Finally, of course the Catholic school system shares some of the blame, it has a vested interest in its own survival.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  24. Barnshee (profile) says:

    “exposure of their children to Irish culture, sport, language and historical and geographical knowledge beyond the border will result in them being somehow less British.”

    No thanks- the prod has had enough experience of ” Irish culture” particularly over the last 50 years to do– thanks but no thanks

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  25. Barney (profile) says:

    Barnshee wrote
    “No thanks- the prod has had enough experience of ” Irish culture” particularly over the last 50 years to do– thanks but no thanks”

    Splendid!
    I look forward to the end of The Grand Orange Lodge
    of Ireland.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  26. Pete Rock (profile) says:

    Gallaglaigh u

    Loyalists don’t want Catholic education, nor would it seem Catholics educating. Makes you wonder what type of state we’d live in had loyalism no been kicked into touch by croppies who wouldn’t lie down!

    How convenient of you to dismiss the young lads undoubtedly from Loyalist backgrounds, who came out in support of their Catholic teacher.

    Once again progressive actions overlooked in order to spout nonsense.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  27. Harry Flashman (profile) says:

    “The simple part: Abolish CCMS, i.e. Catholic schools.

    The agreeable part: Assimilate Catholic students into the Northern Ireland’s version of British state schools and, hey presto, that’s sectarianism largely sorted.”

    Ruari is entirely correct in summing up the “liberal” or “tolerant” position on integrated education.

    At the risk of Godwinism it is akin to a scenario where the blacks of the southern states of the US faced with their second-class status, denied state employment, discriminated against economically and politically, subject to abuse by state forces and having their electoral rights curtailed managed to achieve a superior education system for their communities against all the odds.

    Imagine they produced excellent schools that gave black kids an excellent education and pride in themselves and which left the education provided to working class white kids behind in the dust.

    Then imagine after all the conflict and struggle was over and the progessives looked around and saw what the blacks had and noted that the blacks didn’t choose to go to the majority white but academically poor state schools and suddenly the progressives shriek at the injustice of what the blacks have and how they must hand over their schools to the state because it was educating blacks separately that apparently caused all the problems in the first place.

    Anyone else see something wrong in that picture?

    By the way where’s the first 100 posts gone?

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 2
  28. feismother (profile) says:

    “By the way where’s the first 100 posts gone?

    Check “Older Comments”, Harry.

    -”Bollocks theHassons empire and -the LEP- the place littered with Catholic owned bars But its OK to bomb the prod?”

    Barnshee, the “Hassons empire” had more than its fair share of bombs in the seventies. I remember. I worked in a Catholic (if that’s relevant) owned business on Ferryquay Street in the seventies and cleared up after two large bombs. My in-laws ran small businesses on the outskirts – PO/Pharmacy – robbed 20+ times, no doubt it contributed to my Father-in Law’s premature death and my MiL didn’t died in post too.

    I could say a lot more but don’t want to go down the whataboutery route but just correct you on one factual point:

    “(The “new” Foyle school is now occupied by a Roman catholic school). ”

    No, St Mary’s is built on the Templemore site. To date, Foyle College is still where it always was, operating on the split site between Duncreggan Road and further out the Northland Road. It does plan to move to the Ebrington site but as yet I don’t believe a sod has been turned.

    As for education in my experience most parents opt for what they see as what’s best for their children irrespective of sector. When Armagh Integrated College closed a few years ago I asked somebody in Education why. Their explanation was that the area was well served by the existing schools and there was no market for it. If anybody has a better explanation I’d be interested.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  29. IJP (profile) says:

    Ruairi

    You raise a lot of challenging points here.

    I put it another way in my Haass submission: I said that, to outsiders to NI, getting rid of segregated education is obvious (given the divided nature of society leading to conflict) – yet to insiders it is far from clear how you would do it and, actually, if it would really solve anything.

    I made a parallel: to outsiders to the US, getting rid of guns is obvious (given the almost unbelievable homicide rate there) – yet again to insiders it is far from clear how you would od it and, actually, if it would really solve anything.

    Firstly, getting rid of guns in the United States would be very difficult. Precisely how do you go about collecting 250 million guns? How do you ensure that they are definitely collected from those most likely to use them to kill? Likewise, how do you go about integrating Northern Ireland’s education system? How do you ensure culture, religion, history and so on are all taught fairly (thus, in a way which, almost certainly, will be alien to parents)?

    Secondly, the guns exist in the United States because of the high murder rate, not the other way around. It was always a frontier country; it was always comparatively dangerous, therefore, by Western standards. Likewise, the segregated education system exists in Northern Ireland because of our divided society, not the other way around. We have always been divided; there has never been a time when we haven’t been.

    I do take a personal view that religion should be taken out of the state-funded education system; and that bishops have no business being involved in decisions which should be taken by educationalists. But that’s a slightly separate point – and even it wouldn’t be easily achieved in practice.

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0
  30. Naughton (profile) says:

    As all too often on Slugger, a commentator starts a reasonable discussion, but just watch the hatred and bitterness spill out as the posts continue.

    Sadly too many come across as bitter, middle-aged males in ‘broadcast only/seeking to take offense’ mode.

    That is a pity, but also good evidence (if even more were needed) of the need to forge better mutual respect and understanding in our young people.

    btw What exactly is wrong with striving to ‘get along’ with our neighbours and fellow citizens (seems to have become a prejorative term for some commentators) ?

    What do you think?
    (Log in or register to judge or mark as offensive)
    Commend 0

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Copyright © 2003 - 2014 Slugger O'Toole Ltd. All rights reserved.
Powered by WordPress; produced by Puffbox.
147 queries. 1.089 seconds.