Death of Dolours Price – opens up possibility that her taped oral history will be published (or not)

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Dolours Price – sister, mother, bomber, prisoner and a thorn in Gerry Adams’ side – died in her Malahide home on Wednesday night. The Guardian’s Ireland correspondent Henry McDonald writes:

Price was involved in a car bombing at the Old Bailey in 1973, which injured more than 200 people and may have led to one person’s death of heart failure. The ex-IRA prisoner, who went on hunger strike with her sister Marian in the 1970s and was subjected to forcefeeding in English prisons, had struggled with alcohol problems later in life.

She became an arch-critic of Gerry Adams, claiming the Sinn Féin president had ordered her to have one of the most famous victims of the IRA – Jean McConville – abducted from her west Belfast home, murdered across the border in the Republic and buried in secret in 1972.

Price alleged that she was given the task of driving McConville, a widow, away from her 10 children in the Divis flats complex to her death on the County Louth coast. McConville became the most famous of the “Disappeared” – IRA victims whom the organisation killed and buried in secret during the Troubles.

Price claimed Adams had set up a secret IRA unit in Belfast to weed out informers, both in its ranks and within the wider nationalist community, who were helping the security forces. The Sinn Féin Louth TD, one of the key architects of the Northern Ireland peace process, has consistently denied her allegations.

Henry McDonald’s piece also refers to the remarkable interview that Dolours Price gave to CBS news last year in which she repeated her claims. She also spoke to the Sunday Telegraph.

It is thought that the PSNI team investigating the 1972 murder of Jean McConville are behind the UK Government request to get hold of the taped interviews with Dolours Price (and other republicans) which are currently held in the Burns Library at Boston College as part of the oral history Belfast Project.

Loyalist and republican contributors gave interviews on the understanding that they would only be released or used after their death. While the PSNI have been pursuing the taped conversations held in the US – which would carry little evidential weight in any court case – they did not take opportunities to interview Dolours Price face-to-face when she was up in Newry court nor at her home in Dublin.

Following the death of IRA member Brendan Hughes and UVF member/PUP politician David Ervine, Ed Moloney published the book Voices from the Grave based on the recorded reminiscences of the two former paramilitary leaders. A TV documentary was also produced.

According to an affidavit made by Ed Moloney, unlike Dolours Price’s more recent media comments, the Belfast Project interviews will not shed light on Jean McConville’s disappearance.

… in her interviews with BC researcher, Anthony McIntyre, Dolours Price did not once mention the name “Jean McConville”. The subject of that unfortunate woman’s disappearance was never mentioned, not even once. Nor so were the allegations that Dolours Price was involved in any other disappearance carried out by the IRA in Belfast, nor that she received orders to disappear people from Gerry Adams or from any other IRA figure. None of this subject matter was disclosed in her taped interviews with Anthony McIntyre.

In an affidavit to US District of Massachusetts Court, Anthony McIntyre was of the opinion that Dolours Price would be “deeply traumatized were
the confidentiality guarantees given to her by me not to be honored” (ie, if the tapes were released early).

However, Dolours Price’s death does offers the opportunity for her taped testimony and interviews with Anthony McIntyre to finally be released and published in book or documentary form in the short to medium term.

Update – In Dublin, Gerry Adams [video] expressed his “profound sadness” at the news of the death of Dolours Price.

I want to extend my sincere condolences to her family and especially to her two sons, Danny and Oscar, and her sister Marian. Marian should be released from detention. I have known Dolours for a very long time. She endured great hardship during her time in prison in the 1970s enduring a hunger strike which included force feeding for over 200 days. In more recent years she has had many personal trials. I am sure all of those who knew Dolours will be very sad at the news of her death. Go ndeanfaidh Dia trocaire uirithi.

Update – Researchers Ed Moloney and Anthony McIntyre have released a statement in which they express their sadness and convey their condolences to Dolours’ family.

Throughout the last two years of our fight to prevent her interviews being handed over to the police in Belfast, our greatest fear was always for the health and well-being of Dolours. Now that she is no longer with us perhaps those who initiated this legal case can take some time to reflect upon the consequences of their action.

Dolours Price’s interviews will not now be immediately handed over, as some reports have wrongly claimed. The interviews are the subject of a stay imposed by the Supreme Court of the United States and that stay remains in place until that court, the highest in the land, decides otherwise. There are other subpoenas outstanding and as far as we are concerned the same issues affect them as they did Dolours Price’s case and we intend continuing the fight with renewed vigor to stop the remaining Belfast Project interviews from being handed over.

The Boston Globe’s Kevin Cullen notes that incoming US Secretary of State John Kerry petitioned outgoing US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton over the tapes case. Also Belfast Telegraph analysis, and coverage in the Irish News, Irish Times, Independent.

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  • Mark

    RIP .

  • tomthumbuk

    I wonder will there be the same clamour for justice for Jean McConville as there has been for Pat Finucane?

  • sherdy

    There seems to be an unseemly scramble to gain access to these now internationally famous tapes with virtually no thought or expression of regret at this unfortunate woman’s death.
    But I was relieved to see your article ended with condolences from Gerry Adams.

  • Dixie Elliott

    Ar dheis Dé go raibh a hanam uasal

  • 6crealist

    R.I.P.

    Adams couldn’t help but get a dig in at the end – ‘she was crazy but God bless her’. Classy.

  • Bee42

    RIP.

    I know she suffered from health problems, but this was a shock, to me at least. The timing just seems troubling somehow.

  • anne warren

    Vīxit
    She lived her life.
    May she rest in peace

  • Henry94

    Sad news. Condolences to her family and friends. Any political implications are for another day. Rest In Peace.

  • SDLP supporter

    De mortuis, nil nisi bonum.

    Only God knows what she had on her conscience and what demons she had to grapple with.

    In her own way, a victim of the unspeakable blasphemy that is Irish physical force ‘republicanism’.

  • Rory Carr

    I first met Dolours in the summer of 1972 just before internment was introduced and was strongly smitten by her ethereal beauty and no less by her seriousness, her passion, her dedication. I met her a few times later and then heard of her arrest in London.

    I still recall walking in a picket of Home Secretary, Roy Jenkins’s London residence in the pouring rain, seething with murderous rage as Dolours and her comrades hovered close to death after 200 days of hunger strike and forced feeding.

    Ever after I could scarce bear to hear paeans to Jenkins’ “liberalism” without swearing. The foremost columnist for TheTimes, Bernard Levin however, widely seen as much less liberal, wrote a strongly worded prominent article praising the steadfastness and courage of Dolours and Marian, recognising the motivation that gave rise to their actions, positing the need for future negotiation on Ireland and calling for clemency and the transfer of the sisters to Ireland. It would have been an appropriate moment to link to that article but I am afraid that I was unable to excavate a copy.

    To say that Dolours was ill in recent times is not to make any political statement on differences within Republicanism, nor, as Henry94 suggests, would it be appropriate if it were. But Dolours was manifestly ill when I last saw her in that video from CBS and while it was sad, I was yet able to discern that youthful lovlieness that I recall shine through the pain.

    Condolences to her family and close friends. May she find the peace that eluded her in life.

  • Kevsterino

    Those who kick the dead on the internet are not being their best selves. Regrettable.

  • Mick Fealty

    We have a rule here. That is you respectfully comment on the recently deceased. Without exception! I’ve removed the more offensive stuff without resorting to cards. Just let people say what they want/need to at this time?

  • Harry Flashman

    The death of Dolours Price is a great loss to her family, as someone who suffered a similar loss in recent years I can well imagine the pain her children and loved ones are going through at the moment.

    However, it is not disrespectful to the recently deceased to recall what they actually did in their lifetimes.

    Planting a no-warning car bomb in a busy city street in the middle of the afternoon is an appalling thing to have done. Hundreds of innocent men, women and children were injured, some suffered dreadful wounds.

    She herself admitted that she drove unarmed prisoners to their murder, she was honest enough to admit she engaged in these activities without compunction. I don’t recall her speaking sympathetically or with respect for her victims, although perhaps I missed those comments.

    May Dolours Price receive the peace that seemed to elude her in life, and may her passing be marked with more dignity than that granted to the men and women she drove to their demise.

  • http://www.organizedrage.com/ Mickhall

    Condolences to her family and close friends. As Rory wrote above, may she find the peace that eluded her in life.

  • carl marks

    SDLP supporter

    I agree,
    My sympathy to the family.
    on the tapes, publish them

  • Barry the Blender

    Having considered what a calculated effort she made to ruin the lives of others, it would be insensitive and morally wrong to wish this woman to rest in peace.

    I shall miss her criticisms of the great bearded one though.

  • Rory Carr

    It would certainly be judgmental, Barry, to withhold such charity but I fail to see the morality hiding therein.

  • Toastedpuffin

    With the (somewhat tribalistic) outpouring of sympathy for the Price family, it’s perhaps not out of place to spare a thought for her victims.

    I certainly hope the family of Frederick Milton (whose name it’s rather hard to track down) managed to find some peace.

  • Comrade Stalin

    Harry – I thought your comment got it just about right.

  • Reader

    Mick Fealty: We have a rule here. That is you respectfully comment on the recently deceased. Without exception! I’ve removed the more offensive stuff without resorting to cards.
    How about an immediate heavily policed memorial thread, followed within a day or so by a ‘legacy’ thread? You really need to get a solid and consistent process in place before Margaret Thatcher dies.

  • Neil

    Marion has been refused compassionate bail for her sister’s funeral.

  • Kevsterino

    Reader, perhaps people can delay their expressions of contempt for the deceased until they are buried. I’d be willing to contain myself until the milk snatcher is in the ground.

  • Alias

    Reader, a better rule would be not to have these ‘memorial’ threads during the period when comment will be deleted due to the bizarre European custom of only saying nice things or paying tribute to recently deceased.

    It is irritating in the extreme to have to refrain from providing some balance to ‘tributes’ to someone who has comitted appalling acts of carnage and murder and devasted so many human lives.

  • Knucklehead Smiff

    “We have a rule here. That is you respectfully comment on the recently deceased”.

    Respectfully on…towards who ? Who’s in receipt of the dis/respect ? Who’s being spared any dis/respect and on what grounds are they being spared ? Why respectfully comment rather than comment respectfully ? How recent’s recent ? Who’s “we” ? How much disrespect is permissible/respectable before someone dies ? If the person’s the ball as well as – or instead of – the man is it disrespectful to disrespect them ? Are they in play if so (…if only when they’re alive) ? Does proximity to death inform the degree of disrespect that’s allowable ?

  • anne warren

    What I am about to write refers to any deceased person.

    The people being spared any disrespect are the surviving family members and friends of the deceased

    They loved/liked the diseased
    They are entitled to be left to grieve in peace

    Whatever one says/writes will have no effect on the person who has passed on.

    It may have some effect on some individual/s in the surviving circle of family and friends

    Whatever one’s personal opinion of the dead person one has no right to add to the distress of family and friends who are understandably upset at the loss of the person.

    And who may have had nothing to do with the deceased’s actions in life.

    In reply to
    “How recent is recent?” I would ask “How long is the grieving process?”

    “Who’s we?”
    Any decent person who gives respect and demands it accordingly

    .

  • Alias

    What a load of codswallop.

    I’m more concerned with the emotions of the families and friends of the victims murdered by this ilk and with those victims still living who had flesh and limb ripped from them by these murderers as their means of advancing some warped agenda than I am with feelings of these unrepentant killers and their clan.

    Perhaps some folks should ponder on the miserable lives this ‘hero’ visited on 10 children in Belfast or on the psychopathic mentality of pretending to their mother that she was a nun bringing her to safety, showing such acts of ‘kindness’ as buying her fish and chips and cigarettes while all the time knowing she was participating in her murder. No doubt she’ll be laid to rest in a grave with flowers and all the rest where her family can attend, which is more than she allowed to her victim or her 10 children.

  • BluesJazz

    Alias
    My post was ‘taken down’ for stating facts that Ms Price herself admitted. It was similar to yours.

    Her victims never got an internet obituary.

  • anne warren

    It is disrespectful, not to the deceased (who couldn’t care less as I have already said), but to the living who are left to mourn for her.

    She had brothers and sisters, an ex-husband and sons. She had friends. Let those people have some space to grieve.

    The final point I will make here is that in no way is the deceased immune from having her legacy critically examined and her life looked at to determine why she behaved as she did.

    In the case of Dolours Price there may well be a great deal to discuss.
    But what’s the rush?
    That life has just ended.
    That legacy will still be there to examine next week, next month and next year.

    Do you have to start in immediately? Would that provide a critical examination of her life? Or would it be nothing but an expression of hate, and thus bring the commenter down to the level of the supposed demon who lies buried?

    As Wordsworth wrote better to express “emotion recollected in tranquillity”

  • GEF

    “Marion has been refused compassionate bail for her sister’s funeral.”

    Neil, thats not what it says in todays BT.

    “Veteran republican Marian Price is too ill to attend the funeral of her sister Dolours, friends of the family have said.

    Price, who is being held under armed guard in the psychiatric unit of Belfast City Hospital, hasn’t asked the Prison Service for her to be freed for the funeral.

    Instead, her solicitor Peter Corrigan has requested that his client be granted compassionate parole for a few hours to visit the wake house and say goodbye to her sister.”

    Read more: http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/local-national/northern-ireland/what-did-dolours-price-really-know-about-the-provos-16265957.html#ixzz2J821esBV

  • wee buns

    @Alias and BluesJazz
    I’m more concerned with the emotions of the families and friends of the victims’
    ‘’Her victims never got an internet obituary.

    Whadaboutry alert – that compassion for its own sake can’t be held for any family recently bereaved without deflecting the issue onto a different family.

    So according to you both, Price’s children don’t deserve compassion at this time because of deeds completely outside of their control.

  • Alias

    “She had brothers and sisters, an ex-husband and sons. She had friends. Let those people have some space to grieve.”

    And so do her victims, who may read the same threads where a one-side view of the murderer is portrayed. Is it only the feelings of the murderer’s family who are to be considered, with the murdered person’s family due no such consideration? Her crimes are why she has this thread, so those crimes shouldn’t be excluded from it as though she came to our attention for some reason other than inflicting misery, mayhem and murder on others.

    In reality, neither of them is likely to be browsing the Internet at this time and happen upon this thread so I think it rather silly not to tell the truth with that as the excuse. However, it’s Mr Fealty’s forum and his rules so those are the rules I’m playing by.

    And even if they did happen upon the thread, so what? Were they unaware that the deceased committed appalling acts of murder and carnage against innocent people? Did they think others were unaware? Or perhaps, like you, they think no less of her for all that? Indeed, perhaps, they think all the more of her for it?

  • Neil

    http://www.freemarian.co.nr/

    Statement from the family of Marian Price McGlinchey. 25/1/2013

    We have received news that Marian’s application for compassionate parole following the tragic death of her sister Dolours has been refused, despite her being granted bail earlier today.

  • GEF
  • babyface finlayson

    Alias
    “At the end of the day, you have to be respectful of the dead as that practice is a potent cultural aspect of society. It doesn’t mean you have to respect the dead person but it does mean you have to be decent about it so soon after the death.”
    Take these wise words to heart, my friend.
    Who said them?
    You did, on the thread about Billy Hunter.

  • GEF

    Regards paying respect for the dead. Read what Susan Mckay says about Dolours’s respect for the funeral of Joe Cahill in 2004. She even went out of her way to be disrespectful by driving her car along the Falls Rd when it was closed off for his funeral procession to pass.

    “I knew her slightly, and interviewed her a few years ago as part of a film about the former IRA leader Joe Cahill. I knew she had deliberately driven her car down the Falls Road when it was closed to allow his funeral cortege to pass, and wanted to know why she had felt it important to show such disrespect. Rage rendered her incoherent. The film makers could not use the interview, and had the bad manners not to tell her. She rang me and denounced me as a scumbag.”

    http://news.google.co.uk/news/url?sa=t&ct2=uk%2F0_0_s_1_0_t&usg=AFQjCNEsjg5EwatKfa6Lulbvtj7vXeCssQ&did=a63698e9ad0c9b24&cid=52778072971701&ei=hzsFUdnKI42S8gPj7gE&rt=STORY&vm=STANDARD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.independent.ie%2Fopinion%2Fanalysis%2Ftroubled-soul-who-never-found-peace-when-the-fighting-ended-3364242.html

  • Neil

    You can still see why the ‘rule’ exists here though, regardless of what others choose to do? Or the place would be swarming with people figuratively buzzing the cortege and beeping their horn. It’s a good rule. See the Billy Hunter stuff. That too was a tragedy for the family, and I’m sure plenty of folk bit their tongue at that point – I did. The opportunity will come soon enough to get back to talking about her with utter contempt, some people will just have to have patience.

  • GEF

    If Gerry Adams is to stay away from Dolours funeral I am sure the other Gerry will no doubt be present.

    http://www.newsletter.co.uk/news/headlines/adams-to-stay-away-from-funeral-1-4726861

  • Alias

    Babyface, there is no inconsistency there unless you are arguing that my comments on this thread lacked decency? I think you’ll have a hard task showing that is the case.

    “At the end of the day, you have to be respectful of the dead as that practice is a potent cultural aspect of society. It doesn’t mean you have to respect the dead person but it does mean you have to be decent about it so soon after the death.

    Now, wasn’t that good advice? ;)

  • Alias

    Also, the ‘beef’ isn’t with a family’s right to mourn their loss. It is with threads being posted for famous murderers where only ‘tributes’ are allowed to be posted, thereby creating the bogus impression that the deceased was an esteemed member of society and that society should mourn their passing. Why post such threads at all?

  • http://gravatar.com/joeharron Mister_Joe

    Alias,

    You seem to be deliberately obtuse, given what you said on the Mr.Hunter thread.
    As many others have pointed out, the respect being asked for is to leave the family alone to grieve.

  • babyface finlayson

    Alias
    “you have to be respectful of the dead as that practice is a potent cultural aspect of society.”
    “the bizarre European custom of only saying nice things or paying tribute to recently deceased.”
    I see a contradiction there yes.
    Where I maybe agree with you is in wondering why these threads are posted, since they invariably invite the over pious tribute or bitter vitriol.
    Of course we don’t have to comment on them. (Before Mick points that out!)

  • GEF

    “you have to be respectful of the dead as that practice is a potent cultural aspect of society.”

    King Charles 2nd did not uphold this view. Cromwell died in 1658 and Charles had his 3 year old corpse disinterned from Westminster Abbey in 1661 and hung drawn and quartered at Tyburn. The former Lord Protector’s head was put on a spike above Westminster Hall were it stayed for another 24 years.

  • Alias

    “You seem to be deliberately obtuse, given what you said on the Mr.Hunter thread.”

    I doubt you think that, Joe, since there is no basis for it. I think you actual purpose is to imply hypocrisy, thereby man-playing, with the premise being that those who object to tribute threads for murderers should just be ignored.

    “As many others have pointed out, the respect being asked for is to leave the family alone to grieve.”

    Which begs the question: why post or comment on the thread? If the purpose was not to ‘bother’ them, why bother them with the thread?

    Books of condolences are generally opened for esteemed members of society, not for murderers.

    “I see a contradiction there yes.”

    Well let me enlighten you: the first statement refers to a cultural imperative, and the second statement refers to the bizarre nature of that cultural imperative. The latter statement merely adds to the former, but does not contradict it.

    Are you playing Joe’s game here?

    “Of course we don’t have to comment on them. (Before Mick points that out!)”

    I’m commenting on other comments addressed to me. There is a difference.

  • http://gravatar.com/joeharron Mister_Joe

    Alias,

    I am not implying or otherwise suggesting that you are being hypocritical. I think you are well aware of my opinion of the IRA.

  • babyface finlayson

    Alias
    Thanks for the enlightenment. I see now there is no contradiction.
    “I’m commenting on other comments addressed to me. There is a difference.”
    I’m simply pointing out that you could have just ignored the thread altogether.

  • 6crealist

    Even when he’s caught bang to rights he can’t admit it. Keep spinning.

  • Alias

    “I’m simply pointing out that you could have just ignored the thread altogether.”

    And how exactly would my ignoring the thread have prevented it from becoming a virtual ‘book of condolences’ to a murderer? That outcome could only have occured if others ignored it. You’re not making much sense…

    “Even when he’s caught bang to rights he can’t admit it. Keep spinning.”

    Sorry, but shouting “Bang! Bang!” doesn’t conceal the salient fact that your powder is wet. ;)

  • babyface finlayson

    Oh Alias Jan 2013, why can’t you be more like Alias Sept 2012?
    I have expressed agreement with you that such memorial threads have questionable value.
    But if you are going to comment on them then your earlier attitude is probably more appropriate than the one you have now
    “At the end of the day, you have to be respectful of the dead”.
    I agree with that guy. Lets leave it there.

  • GEF

    “She was granted compassionate leave on Sunday but it has not yet been confirmed whether she will be permitted to attend the funeral.

    “Based on medical advice Marian was given a short period of release on Sunday morning to attend the wake of her sister,” a spokeswoman for the Department of Justice said.”

    http://news.google.co.uk/news/url?sa=t&ct2=uk%2F0_0_s_0_0_t&usg=AFQjCNFdUfgFgp5tmx4ROz0kRWtADinoKw&did=ac36580a15a815db&cid=52778072971701&ei=9FwGUfGTCY2S8gPj7gE&rt=STORY&vm=STANDARD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.u.tv%2FNews%2FDolours-Price-funeral-to-take-place%2Fbd1d93e7-ecfd-49ea-887b-31e9e98db8be

  • http://alaninbelfast.blogspot.com Alan in Belfast

    This morning’s Irish News confirmed that following an appeal Marian Price was freed from custody on Sunday morning to spend up to four hours with family at the wake house.

    Solicitor Kevin Winters said: “Marian wanted to grieve with her family at the wake as she is extremely unwell and there were some issues about her physical fitness to attend the funeral”.

  • galloglaigh

    Looking at some of the comments here, I’m scratching my head as to why I was given two red cards. All I did was claim Robbo wasn’t a man of peace. Comments like that fly off the tongues’ of some Sluggerites like honey off a spoon and not a dickey bird.

    Here’s a question I would like answered:

    How many times can I say ‘not a dickie bird’, and how many times can I be ignored?

    I think I might ask Henry Riley for a speaking role in my cities next Civil Right’s March. My Sluggerite civil rights are being eroded.

    For God and Slugger :P

    ps RIP Dolours Price…

  • GEF

    “Marian Price, also known as McGlinchey, received three hours’ compassionate parole. The MLAs were told to keep her under constant supervision and only immediate family, were allowed in the house when she was there……………….
    Price’s husband, Jerry McGlinchey, said: “We are relieved Marian got to say goodbye to Dolours. She hadn’t seen her sister during the 20 months she has been imprisoned so she would have been devastated had she not been allowed this visit.” Her release followed intense behind-the-scenes talks over the weekend involving lawyers, politicians and the authorities. She will not attend the funeral and did not ask to do so.”

    Read more: http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/local-national/northern-ireland/marian-price-leaves-hospital-for-sisters-wake-16266891.html#ixzz2JKtK9iU3

  • Alias

    “At the end of the day, you have to be respectful of the dead”.

    I agree with that guy. Lets leave it there.

    Let’s not. Let’s finish the sentence that you truncated for the purpose of alter its meaning to suit your bogus claim:

    “At the end of the day, you have to be respectful of the dead as that practice is a potent cultural aspect of society.

    The next sentence expounds:

    “It doesn’t mean you have to respect the dead person but it does mean you have to be decent about it so soon after the death.”

    And as I invited you to do but you were either unwilling or unable to do:

    “Babyface, there is no inconsistency there unless you are arguing that my comments on this thread lacked decency? I think you’ll have a hard task showing that is the case.”

    Was it that hard a task after all that you had to resort to repeating a bogus claim and making things up by editing sentences?

    As for decency, my friend, it doesn’t reside with those who pay tribute to murderers. There was nothing said my me on this thread that lacked decency. I know its part of the ‘peace process’ agenda to pretend that vile murderers were really just poor victims of misforunate circumstances and that PIRA terrorists were really just misguided but well intentioned civil rights activists who we should all just forgive and forget about, etc, but if you don’t mind, I think I’ll not forget about it while their victims, such as Helen McKendry, are still actively seeking justice and are more deserving of our sympathy and support that the ilk who inflicted such unmitigated misery on them.

  • Alias

    And one other point to ponder, there is no other circumstance that I am aware of where a person can freely admit to involvement in a murder and still not be arrested by the police and questioned about it.

    I can guarantee you that if you went on TV and admitted to your involvement in some murder you’d have the police knocking on your door the next day.

    Unless, of course, you implicated a person who was protected by the State and that is why the police didn’t coming knocking.

  • GEF

    “Unless, of course, you implicated a person who was protected by the State and that is why the police didn’t coming knocking.”

    Alias, I presume you mean this gentleman (below) who is making an apology for the actions of a terrorist organisation he tells the whole world he was never a member of.

    “Gerry Adams apologises over Garda officer murder”

    http://www.newsletter.co.uk/news/headlines/gerry-adams-apologises-over-garda-officer-murder-1-4732873

  • GEF

    ‘McConville relative raps socialist for Dolours Price tribute

    A TRIBUTE to republican hardliner Dolours Price has been attacked by an IRA victim’s relative.

    Ms Price, who admitted to having helped to abduct murder victim Jean McConville in 1972, was referred to as having been a “soft-hearted person” in a funeral oration by socialist Eamonn McCann.’

    http://www.newsletter.co.uk/news/headlines/mcconville-relative-raps-socialist-for-dolours-price-tribute-1-4733840