When the facts change, I’ll stick with my beliefs

Nice piece from the Boston Globe (via Gavin on Google Reader), which may or may not have a relevance to the ongoing saga at Northern Ireland Water (which has ruined many people’s attempts to take a holiday, including my own)…

In reality, we often base our opinions on our beliefs, which can have an uneasy relationship with facts. And rather than facts driving beliefs, our beliefs can dictate the facts we chose to accept. They can cause us to twist facts so they fit better with our preconceived notions.

Worst of all, they can lead us to uncritically accept bad information just because it reinforces our beliefs. This reinforcement makes us more confident we’re right, and even less likely to listen to any new information. [Emphasis added]

It’s long, but worth reading the whole way through… There is not, it seems an easy answer, since grand old American institutions like NBC’s Meet the Press have a fraction of the clout on the business it had in pre internet days…

Instead of focusing on citizens and consumers of misinformation, Nyhan suggests looking at the sources. If you increase the “reputational costs” of peddling bad info, he suggests, you might discourage people from doing it so often. “So if you go on ‘Meet the Press’ and you get hammered for saying something misleading,” he says, “you’d think twice before you go and do it again.”

Unfortunately, this shame-based solution may be as implausible as it is sensible. Fast-talking political pundits have ascended to the realm of highly lucrative popular entertainment, while professional fact-checking operations languish in the dungeons of wonkery. Getting a politician or pundit to argue straight-faced that George W. Bush ordered 9/11, or that Barack Obama is the culmination of a five-decade plot by the government of Kenya to destroy the United States — that’s easy. Getting him to register shame? That isn’t.

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  • Cynic

    Dem facts is pesky things

  • drumlins rock

    Never let the facts get in the way of a good story, but it has to a good one! Of course the truth is normally stranger than fiction its jsut a matter of digging up the juicy bits!

  • DR “Never let the facts get in the way of a good story”
    Is this the latest press release from the DRD?

  • This poses a few questions about the value of a Truth Commission.