Saville choked on the breadth of its terms of reference…

This one has been on my list of things to blog for the last couple of days… It relates to a BBC Radio 4 programme that went out on Thursday night… You can get it on the iPlayer or better take the podcast… I was particularly interested in this quote from Sir Louis Blom-Cooper, one of the barristers who appeared before the inquiry, who believes it was flawed from the start:

He argues that Lord Saville misinterpreted his remit. “He thought his primary function was to go down the long road of examining in great detail the individual killings. It was an absurd way of going about the inquiry. The real essence should have been to say: why did it happen, how did it happen?” Some solicitors and barristers have told The Report Lord Saville’s background as a commercial lawyer made him the wrong person for the job. One described the inquiry as a “PhD gone wrong.”

And now it is over the line of the 2005 Enquiries Act and the comprehensive truth burying package of the St Andrews Agreement (leaving the Policing Board as one of the few bodies that can legitimately probe the past), there is little to no chance of this can of worms being reliably sorted for fault or blame. No doubt there will be people who seek to penetrate those eleven years of gathering, sifting and analysing evidence in order to apportion blame. But Lord Saville has the luxury of a miles and miles of documentation and the unwillingness of the IRA to testify to fudge his conclusions…

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